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The EULA is an end user license agreement (also known as a software license agreement (SLA) or end user agreement for licensed applications. In general, the EULA is a legally binding agreement between the owner of a product (often software) and the end user – more precisely a contract between the licensor of a product and the licensee. ITAs are important for protecting the rights of the license owner and are essential for defining usage rules and managing end-user expectations. Generally speaking, the EULA helps you define the terms of your license agreement with the user – explain what they can and cannot do with the software, under what conditions its access can be limited or terminated, copyright rules, etc. 7. PRIVACY. Zebra`s Data Protection Directive (at www.zebra.com/us/en/about-zebra/company-information/legal/privacy-statement.html), as amended from time to time, is included in this EUA by reference. When end users transmit personal data to Zebra related to the use of zebra hardware or software, the manner in which Zebra collects and uses such data is governed by Zebra`s Privacy Policy in accordance with applicable law. Zebra is committed to complying with the GDPR and the addition of Zebra`s GDPR (found in: www.zebra.com/us/en/about-zebra/company-information/legal/gdpr.html) complements Zebra`s Privacy Policy to the extent that zebra provides personal data and the GDPR applies to the end user. The enforceability of an ITA depends on several factors, one of which is the court before which the case is tried. The licensee`s rights under this ITA shall automatically terminate without notification from zebra if the licensee fails to comply with any of the conditions of this ITA. Zebra may terminate the EULA by offering Licensee a replacement agreement for the Software or any new version of the Software and by making licensee`s continued use of the Software or a new version subject to acceptance of such substitute agreement. At the end of this ITA, Licensee shall cease all use of the Software and destroy all or part of the copies of the Software.

The 7th circuit and the 8th circuit support the “licensed and unsold” argument, while most other circuits do not. .